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Philadelphia, PA

267-702-6744

An nonprofit, independent book publisher and writers' workshop located in Philadelphia that creates innovative relationships between the authors and the work they produce.

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Shockwire Chapbook Series

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Debates-Defenses-Dreams_Cover.png
Debates-Defenses-Dreams_Cover.png
Salvaging-the-Dormant_Cover.png
Time-Stamps_Cover.png
Some-Old-Houses_Cover.png
Implosion_Cover.png
No-Clock-Time_Cover.png
Cover_olivetree.png
Cover_Aleppo.png
Cover_HouseofOurBrothers.png
Cover_IntroTCM.png
Cover_OppositePrayer.png
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Shockwire Chapbook Series

from 3.00

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Browse through our Shockwire Chapbook Series and choose any 1 for $3, any 2 for $5, or any 3 for $8! Please select the title(s) you want in the form section in checkout and we’ll send you a confirmation that we received your selection(s).

About the Series

Our new Shockwire Chapbook Series recognizes the need to raise the storytelling stakes in response to intimidation, fear, and inequality. Click here to read more

  • Debates, Defenses, and Dreams - Norman Cain weaves together the most poignant and formative moments of a life lived in service to education, civil rights, and his country in this brief but mighty work of memoir. From his account of a fiery Philly neighborhood debate between his mother and the most influential man on the block to his memories of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. speaking at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, Cain’s reflections shine a light on a remarkable span of American history.

  • Salvaging the Dormant: On Language - How often, as English speakers, do we take for granted the freedom to communicate unencumbered, not only in person but on a multitude of platforms at any time? How often do we turn our thoughts to endangered, dormant, and sometimes revitalized languages and their speakers? Sarah Grey reminds us of the life, death, and uncertain futures of the world’s linguistic diversity in this beautiful and sometimes heartbreaking essay.

  • Time Stamps - Briyanna Hymms’s work moves between poetry and gorgeous prose, meditating on the unique pressures of being a first-generation American. As a child of immigrants, how can you return your parents’ sacrifices? Hymms’s story is an honest and lovely exploration of this question that feels fiercely real.

  • Some Old Houses - Through her story, Lauren Lowe offers a poignant look at the redevelopment of Chinatown. Lowe tugs at the lines of outsiderness and insiderness, revealing how gentrification makes strangers out of everyone. Lowe’s piece is a beautiful examination of mixed heritage, the power of space and being seen in that space, and the unshakability of home.

  • Implosion - Finding a safe and affordable place to live can be challenging in the best of circumstances; Carol Richardson McCullough deftly pens the story of her journey with Philadelphia’s housing authority as she looks for a home for herself and her children, contrasting her experience with the ideals our city’s founders originally intended. McCullough writes with a stark honesty that carries the reader with her, every step of the way.

  • No Clock Time, No Paper Money - Sara Ray’s tale of wilderness training is also a coming-of-age story, wherein the narrator finds her own strength and sense of self. Ray’s writing is simple and meditative; she easily weaves the narrator’s inner thoughts with the rich natural world, laid bare of modern conveniences and conventions.

  • Introduction to The Communist Manifesto - This excerpt of The Communist Manifesto was chosen by writer and activist Nic Esposito for its prescient parallels to the economic challenges and societal shifts we face today. But whatever your impression is of Karl Marx and socialism’s ideals, Esposito's ultimate goal for you, Dear Reader, is to engage with what Marx and his comrades wrote by uniting theory with action.

  • Opposite of Prayer - Douglas W. Milliken writes seven interconnected stories of power, entitlement, and privilege set throughout the northern subtropics. The Opposite of Prayer examines the pinprick where control intersects gender, language, and money, where one's body becomes a weapon and devotion becomes a crutch.

  • House of Our Brothers - Patrick McNeil is a fiction writer based in Philadelphia who has worked with the homeless population for six years. Inspired by this work, House of Our Brothers is a series of vignettes capturing moments in the lives of men grappling with life, addiction, and survival; told with empathy, humor, and self-awareness..

  • to the olive tree branches - Ndeen Al-Barqawi’s poetry unearths urgent truths about legacies of suppression, pain, and redemption, and how those themes interplay with being a queer Muslim woman in 2018. Some of the poems have been transcribed from spoken word performances while others were always destined for the page, making this collection a fearless lyrical hybrid.

  • Aleppo Burning - Ann Struthers lived in Aleppo, Syria, for two years while teaching at the University of Aleppo as a Fulbright Fellow. Her collection is concerned with the stories of friends, colleagues, and students, so many of whom continue to live in peril. From delicately rendered elegies to defiant calls for a lasting peace, each poem is rooted in an abiding love for a place and people wracked by conflict.

  • Report from the Streets: Voices of the Homeless - MK Punky embarked on a yearlong listening project with the intent to capture the stories of individuals who live on the street in Los Angeles. This simple goal--to engage when others are more comfortable avoiding eye contact, let alone starting a conversation--led to a collection of poems MK hopes will act as “a wakeup call from the mute.”